US Insights

Amongst the young, the democrats’ main rival is disengagement

Rob Callender

Director of Youth Insights

Politics 10.10.2016 / 10:00


Kantar
  • SAVE
  • Close

    SHARE THIS WITH FRIENDS

  • EMBED
    Close

    Please copy the below code to embed it into your blog

Looking at how people aged 12-19 feel about politics ahead of the US election

At the beginning of the US election process (doesn’t that feel like a long time ago now?!) there were lots of discussion about the youth vote, generated by the surprising, enormous appeal of Bernie Sanders. Now that Hillary Clinton has seized the Democratic nomination, there is a fear that these young Sanders fans aren’t enthusiastically transitioning to support her. That worry seems well-founded when you consider that Democrats’ main rival among youth isn’t Republicans—it’s disengagement.

Kantar Futures has used their TRU Youth MONITOR to ask US respondents aged 12- to 19-year-old (known as Centennials) questions about political identity, party affinity and political ideology. The data shows that the Democratic party enjoys the support of 34% of Centennials, while liberalism—the party’s foundational ideology—only gets the support of 24% of 12-19 year olds. This suggests the Democratic “brand” enjoys a 10-point premium over its liberal ideology.



Kantar
  • SAVE
  • Close

    SHARE THIS WITH FRIENDS

  • EMBED
    Close

    Please copy the below code to embed it into your blog

The Republican party faces a different reality: the Republican “brand” takes a seven-point penalty compared to an unbranded conservative ideology. Not only does the Republican party face headwinds among youth, the brand gap has widened in recent years. This is noteworthy as teens actually tend to lean a bit more conservative—ideologically and practically—than twenty-somethings.



Kantar
  • SAVE
  • Close

    SHARE THIS WITH FRIENDS

  • EMBED
    Close

    Please copy the below code to embed it into your blog

Our data shows, generally, when Democrats get a boost in support, it comes from previously disengaged teens. And when Democrats lose support, it typically migrates to the “don’t know/don’t care” group.

Of course, for the 2016 election, many of the young people we polled can’t vote, but whichever party wins they’re going to be interested in how to engage with these centennials in the future.

Source: Kantar Futures

Editor's Notes

For more information, or to interview Rob Callender, please contact us.

Latest Stories

2,334 advertisers spent $17.9 million to sponsor the cyber security keyword group we examined.

Money is starting to pour into health care ads.

Brands need to establish themselves as privacy protectors

Tencent hits a hat-trick as it tops the ranking for the third year. Alibaba returns to No.2.

Apple and Google face no real challengers.

Related Content